Chiropractic FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions about Chiropractic

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What conditions do chiropractors treat?

Chiropractors are experts in injuries to the musculoskeletal system, which includes the muscles, ligaments and joints. People think “back pain,” and they think “chiropractor,” but these specialists work in a broader range of health conditions. They help patients of all ages with weight loss, diet, nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle habits in addition to back pain, neck pain and headaches.

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How do I select a chiropractor?

 

 

The best way to select a chiropractor is by talking to your friends, doctors, or even making an appointment for an initial consultation with a few providers. You’ll want to ask how familiar they are with the symptoms you describe and how they would treat your condition. You also want to make sure they’re a good fit for you. Chiropractors get up close and personal, so you’ll want to select a chiropractor who makes you feel comfortable.

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Is chiropractic safe?

For those needing treatment for neuromusculoskeletal concerns, chiropractic is one of the safest, non-drug, noninvasive forms of healthcare available. The risks associated with chiropractic adjustments are very small, in fact, most patients feel immediate pain relief after their treatment. Some patients complain of soreness, aching or stiffness after an adjustment, but similar to sore muscles after exercise, the discomfort fades within a day or two.

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Does chiropractic treatment require a referral from an MD?

You may see a chiropractor without the referral from an MD. If you were in a car accident or have an injury caused by another trauma, your attending physician might refer you for chiropractic care with specific instructions.

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Is chiropractic treatment appropriate for children?

 

Children of all ages can benefit from chiropractic care. Because of their high level of daily activity, kids are prone to experience jolts or falls that can cause injuries. When children visit a chiropractor, the care is adapted so the treatment is more gentle than what an adult would receive.

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Are chiropractors allowed to practice in hospitals or use medical outpatient facilities?

 

Yes. Chiropractors work in many settings and an increasing number are practicing in clinics and hospitals.

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Q: Do insurance plans cover chiropractic?

 

A: Yes. Most health insurance companies plans include chiropractic in their plans.

Chiropractic care is covered by major medical plans, workers’ compensation, Medicare, some Medicaid plans, and Blue Cross Blue Shield plans. The military offers chiropractic care to active duty members on military bases and to veterans at veteran medical centers.

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What type of education and training do chiropractors have?

 

With a focus on the diagnosis and treatment of disorders relating to the musculoskeletal system (the muscles, ligaments, and joints of the spine and extremities) and the nerves that supply it, chiropractors are trained as primary-contact healthcare professionals. Chiropractic doctors must complete some of the most rigorous educational requirements of any healthcare profession. The typical applicant to chiropractic college has previously completed roughly four years of pre-medical undergraduate study, which typically includes biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, and related lab work.

 

The prerequisites increase in difficulty after acceptance into a chiropractic institution; four to five academic years of professional education are typical. Chiropractic physicians receive training in a variety of medical fields, including orthopedics, neurology, physiology, human anatomy, clinical diagnosis, including laboratory techniques, diagnostic imaging, exercise, nutrition, rehabilitation, and more. In order to master their craft, students invest time in clinical technique training because chiropractic therapy involves highly skilled manipulation and adjusting. A minimum of 4,200 hours of classroom, laboratory, and clinical experience are included in the chiropractic college curriculum overall. The Council on Chiropractic Education, accrediting body acknowledged by the U.S. Department of Education, has approved the course of study.

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How is a chiropractic adjustment performed?

 

The manual technique of a chiropractic adjustment or manipulation makes use of the finely honed abilities acquired over several years of intensive chiropractic training. In order to repair or improve joint function, the chiropractor frequently manipulates the body's joints, notably the spine, with his or her hands or an instrument. This frequently relieves joint inflammation and pain in the patient. Chiropractic manipulation is a carefully monitored practice that rarely produces pain. Each patient's unique needs are taken into consideration as the chiropractor modifies the technique. Patients frequently experience improvements in their symptoms right away after receiving treatment.

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Is chiropractic treatment ongoing?

A: Patients typically need to visit the chiropractor several times because chiropractic care is primarily hands-on. A patient must visit the chiropractor's office to receive care. In contrast, a medical doctor's course of treatment frequently incorporates a pre-established plan that is carried out at home (i.e. taking a course of antibiotics once a day for a couple of weeks). A chiropractor may offer acute, ongoing, preventative, and/or chronic therapy, necessitating a set number of visits sometimes. Your chiropractor should explain to you the suggested course of treatment and how long it will last.

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Why is there a popping sound when a joint is adjusted?

 

The popping sound you hear during an adjustment is a gas bubble being released from between joints. The manipulation of joints causes a pressure shift and this allows the trapped gas to be released.